Sign up for this free e-newsletter and Science of Early Child Development (SECD) will send you sample videos and other materials to inspire, engage and stir your curiosity. SECD is a knowledge translation and mobilization initiative with a global perspective that introduces and synthesizes transdisciplinary research underscoring the importance of the early years.Read More →

The Long Reach of Early Childhood (video – 9:47) features compelling voices from across the globe sharing messages about the imperative to invest in early childhood as a primary vehicle to health and equity. The video is part of a suite of online and offline educational materials in the Science of Early Childhood Development (SECD) collection.Read More →

The Brain Architecture Game is a tabletop game that helps people appreciate the impact of early childhood experiences on outcomes across the lifespan. Your goal is to build a brain that is as tall as possible, which represents functionality, and as sturdy as possible, which represents the ability to withstand stresses. The game is a 75-90 minute experience optimized for groups of 4-6 people per table. It can be played in small workshops, conferences, and large events, with as few as 8, or as many as 300 participants.Read More →

There is a growing body of research to support the importance of the first 1001 critical days. This infographic pulls out some key facts and statistics to support the case for action.Read More →

This video, developed by the Alberta Family Welfare Initiative, describes what is meant by the concept “serve and return”. Serve and return is one of the most important forms of child and guardian interaction. It occurs when a parent or caregiver is responsive to a child’s verbal cues and actions. By providing positive feedback via eye contact, sound, words, and physical interaction, the adult helps spark the child’s interest and enthusiasm in practicing things like speech, language and social learning. Without active serve and return engagement, children can lose interest in these activities, potentially undermining the development of fundamental brain architecture.Read More →

L’Alberta Family Wellness Initiative (AFWI) [Initiative albertaine pour le bien-être de la famille] a préparé une formation en ligne visant à rendre la science d’Histoire du cerveau accessible aux professionnels et au public. Cette formation s’adresse aux personnes qui souhaitent approfondir leur compréhension du développement cérébral et des conséquences de ce dernier sur la santé tout au long de la vie. Elle s’adresse également aux professionnels de divers domaines qui cherchent à obtenir un agrément. Une formation approfondie gratuite contiene une série de 19 modules. Cette formation est pour les personnes qui veulent en savoir plus sur la science du développement cérébral. A la fin du cours, vous recevrez un certifcat sur Historie du cerveau.Read More →

The Alberta Family Wellness Initiative (AFWI) has developed an online course to make Brain Story science available to professionals and the public. Brain Story Certification is designed for those seeking a deeper understanding of brain development and its consequences for lifelong health. The course is also designed for professionals seeking certification in a wide range of fields. It is a free, in-depth course comprised of 19 modules. The course is for anyone who wants to learn more about the science of brain development. Upon successful completion of the course you will receive a certificate in Brain Story Science.Read More →

The Alberta Family Welfare Initiative has developed the “Brain Story Toolkit” comprising of videos and documents to foster understanding of brain development and the link with early childhood experiences. This four minute video, “How Brains are Built” was developed with considerable input from partners at the Harvard Center on the Developing Child and the FrameWorks Institute.Read More →

In response to this evolving understanding and a dramatic increase in research on early brain and child development, an expert workgroup of pediatricians and public health professionals revised five modules to provide the latest key information and resources on early brain development, toxic stress, ACEs, parenting and how to be an advocate in your community. In addition, a sixth supplementary module was created with a specific focus on the role of public health professionals.Read More →

In 2009, Harvard’s Center on the Developing Child launched a collaboration with the Interactive Media Division of the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California (USC) to develop and test new ways of communicating the science of early childhood development using interactive media. The “Brain Hero” video, depicting how actions by a range of people in the family and community impact child development, is the first product of this collaboration. This 3-minute video adapts the visual sensibility of interactive game models to a video format and portrays how actions taken by parents, teachers, policymakers, and others can affect life outcomes for both the child and the surrounding community.Read More →

This grid provides a framework and examples for promoting and supporting Early Brain and Child Development (EBCD) in practice. Intended for busy health professionals, the grid, which was developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics Early Brain and Child Development Leadership Workgroup, distills information from a wide array of resources into a practice-friendly framework for pediatricians.Read More →

>On 11th September 2019 USAID hosted a webinar on the science behind the first 1,000 days, brain development and nurturing care. Dr. Sarah Cusick, Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota, provided an overview of how nutrient deficiency in the first 1,000 days can lead to long-term dysfunction and how application of the general principles of nutrient and brain interaction can help inform programming. Patricia Jodrey from USAID’s Child Health Team provided further context through the lens of the Nurturing Care Framework.Read More →